Vienna Agreement Standards

Vienna Agreement Standards

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The Vienna Agreement was signed in 1991 by CEN and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), but entered into force in the mid-2000s. Their primary objective is to avoid duplication of (potentially contradictory) standards between CEN and ISO. Over the past ten years, CEN has adopted a number of ISO standards that have replaced the corresponding CEN standards. [7] In October 2016, the IEC, which publishes the vast majority of international standards for electrical and electronic appliances and systems, and CENELEC, their counterpart at European level, signed, at the CIS Annual General Meeting in Frankfurt, the Frankfurt Agreement which will strengthen the harmonisation between international and European standards. The technical cooperation agreement between ISO and CEN (Vienna Agreement) is a technical cooperation agreement between ISO and the European Committee for Standardization (CEN). It was formally approved by the CEN Management Board on 27 June 1991 in Vienna, after approval by the ISO Executive Board in Geneva on 16 and 17 May 1991, and replaced the Agreement on the Exchange of Technical Information between ISO and CEN (Lisbon Agreement), concluded in 1989. The “codified” Viennese agreement was approved in 2001 by the ISO Council and the CEN Board of Directors. The close link between European and international standardisation activities through the Vienn and Dresden Agreements has meant that 31% and 76% of all European standards adopted by CEN and CENELEC are now technically equivalent or identical to ISO or IEC standards. This high proportion of uniform standards facilitates the implementation of the WTO Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) in the global market. The standardisation bodies of the thirty national members represent the twenty-seven Member States of the European Union, three European Free Trade Association (EFTA) countries and countries likely to join the EU or EFTA in the future. CEN contributes to the objectives of the European Union and the European Economic Area through technical standards (EN standards) that promote free trade, worker and consumer safety, network interoperability, environmental protection, the use of research and development programmes and public procurement. An example of harmonised standards is the standards for materials and products used in the construction sector and included in the Construction Products Directive.

The CE marking is a manufacturer`s declaration that a product complies with all relevant European directives. The European Committee for Standardisation (CEN) is a public standardisation body who has the task of promoting the European Union (EU) economy in world trade, the well-being of European citizens and the environment by providing interested parties with an efficient infrastructure for the development, maintenance and dissemination of consistent standards and specifications. About 80% of all European electrotechnical standards are identical or are based on iec international standards. .